Category Archives: Business Etiquette Newsletter

After the Job Interview-A Handwritten Thank You or Not

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A subscriber recently sent me an email asking about handwritten thank you notes after the job interview. She wanted to know if it was necessary to send one during these times when etiquette and professional conduct seem to have vanished. My answer to her question was a resounding “Yes.” What you do following the interview is just as important as what you do before and during this stressful event.

In my presentations to college and universities students in particular, this question always comes up. At one session there was a recruiter present from a local bank. She told the students that the people who stood out for her were the ones who took the time and made the effort to write a thank you note following the session. She even went so far as to say that she saves the notes she receives.

Key points to keep in mind when sending a handwritten note:

  1. Your handwriting does not matter. You want it to be as legible as possible, but don’t use poor penmanship as an excuse not to write.
  2. Use a quality fold-over note or correspondence card. This is no time to skimp on cost.
  3. Address the envelope and put the stamp on it before the interview. That way, when it is over, you return to your desk, write the note, slip it into the envelope and head for the nearest mail box.
  4. Your thank you note serves as a “sales” letter as well. Use the opportunity to say why you want the job, what your qualifications are, and how you would contribute to the company. Your thank you note is also an opportunity to address anything you overlooked or needs clarification after the interview.

Handwritten thank you notes make a really good impression, but if time is of the essence, send a follow up thank you by email. The Internet is definitely faster than the postal service. The next step is to write a note as well. It may seem redundant, but the paper note will have a longer shelf life than your email and keep you top of mind with the interviewer.

The handwritten note is one of a vanishing species. Very few people think it is important and therefore they do not send one. You will stand out from the crowd and your professional conduct will not go unnoticed when you write your thank you. Your education, skills, experience and expertise are documented on your resume. Your interpersonal skills are evidenced by your personally written thank you.

Good luck to those job seekers!

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

Do Conference Casual And Professionalism Mix?

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As fall approaches, conferences and conventions loom large on our calendars. While some organizations use the summer months to take advantage of lower rates, most corporations recognize that their employees use this time to vacation with family and friends. Once the gong sounds on the Tuesday after Labor Day to mark the end of summer, it is back to business as usual.

The conference brochures and meeting notices start arriving, and you wonder what to pack.  Under “What to Wear,” you read, “The official dress for the conference is business casual. Wear what you are comfortable in.”  What in the world does that mean?  Those words provide no guidance at all.

Your attire speaks volumes about you.  When you are attending a professional conference, keep in mind that you are working, and this is all about business and professionalism.  This is not the time to throw caution to the winds and show up in your favorite jeans and that t-shirt you bought at the convention three years ago.  It’s fine to take your comfy sweats and old shorts, but save them for the workout room.

Think of the image you want to project, and make sure it reflects professionalism. While the true definition of business casual is to dress down one notch from business professional, you might relax the rule slightly for your meeting event, but only slightly.

While traveling to the conference, consider that you will be meeting people and making connections—of the business kind.  Make sure that everyone you encounter before, during and after the conference, forms a positive impression of you. Professional conduct and appearance are the keys to adding the polish that builds profits.

And if you are in need of a speaker at your next conference or convention—one who can address professional conduct–please contact me. I’d be delighted to join you.

Here’s to conduct professional!

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

Email Etiquette Plain and Simple

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Yesterday I read my friend and public relations guru Dan Janal’s weekly blog, which he titled “Email Productivity: Tips to Improve Media Relations and Customer Service.” Needless to say, it struck a chord with me as I read on. I must confess that Dan generally hits the nail right on the head and has a strong message for his readers and followers.

This week he debunks the myth that in order to be productive, you should never check your email in the morning. Those who say that insist that such a practice is “useless, time consuming, distracting, low priority and takes away valuable time from your ‘big ideas.'” I confess that email is the first thing I check in the morning–after I feed the cats. In their opinion, food trumps email.

In addition to those who warn you not to open your email in the morning, there are others who caution you to check your messages only at set times during the day. In one sense this might make you more productive. After all if you are writing a proposal, working on a project or engaged in another important activity, email can be an interruption.

However, if you depend on other people such as clients, customers and even vendors to help you grow your business; you could potentially miss out on valuable opportunities by limiting the times during the day that you open your email.

In my case, as a speaker and trainer, I might miss a message from someone who is looking for a presenter for their next meeting. Perhaps the person they had scheduled had to cancel at the last minute. This person doesn’t have all day to get a response. It may be that a reporter is looking for a quote for an article and has an imminent deadline. In both cases these people will move on and find someone else who can help them.

In my opinion, it is not only bad business to be so arrogant as to put yourself above others, it is discourteous and disrespectful. When the people who support your business need you, be there for them and be responsive, no matter the time of day. Plain and simple, it’s just good email etiquette.

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

What are Those Rules of Cell Phone Courtesy Again?

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July is national cell phone courtesy month, founded in 2002. Over the past 11 years, much has been written and much has been said about cell phone courtesy. You would think by now people would understand the polite and courteous ways to use their cell phones. But we know they don’t. There are still thousands of cell phone abusers out there. Of course, the creation of the smart phone has done nothing to make the situation better; it has only made it worse.

I believe this is the perfect time to do a review of cell phone courtesy, redundant as it may seem to those of you who not only know the rules, but who also follow them.

  1. Turn off your cell phone and put it out of sight when you are in the company of others. Putting it on the table in front of you tells others that you are not fully present.
  2. If a call comes in when you have it on vibrate, resist the urge to check to see who is calling when you are with other people. It is discounting to those around you.
  3. If you chose to talk on your phone in public, lower your voice. The microphone on your phone is highly sensitive. There is no need for cell yell. Strangers don’t want to be privy to your conversation.
  4. If you want to be considered a professional, use a business-like ring tone. Cute little rings will not impress your clients or prospects.
  5. Texting in front of others in a meeting is just as rude as talking on your phone. It may be silent, but everyone knows what you are doing.
  6. Never take a call in a meeting. If you are expecting an important call, let others know. Keep the phone on vibrate so it is not an interruption. Then leave the room to take the call.

If you have any pet peeves about cell phones or smart phones, I would love to know them. Email them to me at lydia@mannersthatsell.com or post your comments in the box below the blog.

When you exercise cell phone courtesy, you set the tone for others.

Cell phone courtesy should be part of your business etiquette and professional package.

Here’s to talking and texting with courtesy and good manners!

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

International Business Etiquette: It’s a Small World

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If you have ever been to Disney World, you are probably familiar with the attraction, “It’s a Small World.”  If you have taken the short boat ride, you can no doubt recall the words and hum the melody.  Now that I brought it up, I have already started humming the tune and will probably be doing so for the rest of the day. In the business world as well as fantasy land, it is definitely a small world.

Our interactions with people from other counties and cultures used to be the result of travel.  Now we interact with people from all over the world on a daily basis because we live and work side-by-side.  We have become a blended society.

Business people are flying all over the world these days on a regular basis, meeting themselves coming and going in airports, hotels and work sites all over the world. Knowing, understanding and practicing international business etiquette is essential for them and for those who stay at home.

If you want to be successful, you need to recognize, respect and appreciate the differences you encounter. If you are currently in business, you must be knowledgeable about the customs of your clients and contacts, sensitive to their traditions and respectful of differences.

No matter the quality of your product or level of your expertise, if you are unaware of the business practices and social customs of others, your business will suffer. One small misstep such as using first names inappropriately, ignoring the rules of timing or sending the wrong color flower to your client, can cost you the relationship, the deal or the sale.  On the other hand being knowledgeable about international customs can improve your business relations and boost your bottom line.

In the 1970’s when Nissan was looking for the site for their first plant in the U.S., competition among the states was fierce.  In the end, Tennessee won.  It wasn’t just the location, the labor force, and the special incentives.  The negotiating teams from Tennessee took the time to study the Japanese culture.  They sent their top people, including the Governor, to the discussions.  By doing so, they showed honor and respect, highly valued by the Japanese. They also matched the naturally slower pace and personal touch of the Japanese, and abandoned the American way of “Let’s get right down to business and get on with it.”

It’s easy to make blunders that can cost you business without ever knowing what you did. Here are a few examples of mistakes that can cost you when you overlook the importance of the rules for international business etiquette.

  1. Immediately using first names with people from another country
  2. Ignoring the dietary rules of Hindus, Jews or Muslims.
  3. Flashing the “OK” sign to someone from South America
  4. Giving  a clock to a person from China
  5. Slapping  a Japanese businessman on the back.
  6. Skipping the small talk in Latin America.
  7. Not using both hands when exchanging business cards in China and Japan.

If you want to be successful doing business with people from other cultures, learn all that you can about them. Do the research.  Start by focusing on greetings and handshakes, business dress, gift-giving, appropriate conversation, gestures and body language, punctuality and styles of negotiating.

There is an old Japanese saying, “The protruding nail gets hammered down.” You don’t want to be the protruding nail that gets hammered down because you didn’t take the time to learn the customs, traditions and business styles of your clients or because you failed to be sensitive to individual differences.

Two great resources for learning about international etiquette are my book, Manners That Sell – Adding the Polish That Builds Profits and Kiss, Bow or Shake Hands.

Do your homework whether you are traveling the world on business, entertaining international business clients on your home turf or working side by side in your office. Every thought, word and deed counts.

If you have ever made any international business blunders, I would love for you to share them with me. I’ll include them in a future article–anonymously, of course.

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

Reset Your Business Etiquette Goals for 2013

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Last week my good friend and technology expert (genius, if the truth be known) Jerry Gitchel posted a blog, which he titled “Fixing to Wait for the 4th of July.”  And we did. With rare exceptions, business people everywhere put off their next move until after the holiday week or weekend. The holiday has come and gone. It is now time to get back to work and on with the job.

Since July marks the mid-point of the year, much is being written about assessing your goals for 2013, where you are now, where you want to be by year’s end and what you will do to move forward.

May I suggest at this point that you revisit and reset your business etiquette goals for 2013? You did make some, didn’t you? Since no one is checking, it’s not too late to jot some down to get you to the end of the year. Only you and your banker will see the difference.

Do you need some suggestions? If so, let me jump in with a few. Given that this is the week you need for catching up after the long holiday, I will be brief and go into more detail later. Here is a list of business etiquette goals for 2013 that you might consider:

  1. Focus more on other people.
  2. Resolve to be more kind and courteous.
  3. Treat your clients, customers and colleagues with more respect.
  4. Listen more than you talk–even you salespeople.
  5. Dress like a professional, not a fashionista.
  6. Work on remembering names.
  7. Practice punctuality.
  8. Review your techno-etiquette.
  9. Put eye contact and a smile on your agenda every day.

Now return to those issues that you were “fixing” to handle after the 4th of July and finish the year by adding the polish that builds profits.

Keep in mind that it is never about the rules, but the relationships!

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

How to Reverse a Bad First Impression

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Have you ever said or done something awkward or unintended during an interview, a first time encounter with a potential client or meeting a new colleague? We all have goofed up at sometime or other and committed a faux pas that was irreversible and possibly unforgettable. It is not the goof that counts; it is how you handle it.

This is the topic that Real Simple Magazine approaches in their July edition. The title of the article is “5 ways to reverse a bad first impression.” The writer of the article, Kaitlyn Pirie, approached five experts from a variety of fields to get their take on this situation. I happen to be one of them and was delighted to share my thoughts.

Here are some of the ideas that the experts offered. Deborah Tannen, author of You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation, says to turn around. She suggests altering your body position during your next conversation. It may change how the person thinks of you. Ora Shtull, an executive coach in New York City, suggests that you stop and focus on the person. We are all constantly in a state of distraction. If you do or say something that creates a bad impression, stop and offer an apology, and invite that person for coffee to let them know how important meeting them is to you.

Chris Harrison, the host of the Bachelor and The Bachelorette, advises people to take  a deep breathe, stay calm and be true to themselves. He says if it doesn’t work out, maybe it wasn’t meant to be. Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of California, Paul Ekman, Ph.D., suggests that people  hold still. He says that fidgeting makes you look nervous and can create a bad first impression.

Finally what is my advice? If you commit a faux pas, keep your sense of humor. Laugh at yourself. You will feel more comfortable and so will the other person. Getting distressed will only make a bad situation worse. Laughter is the best remedy for this kind of predicament and many others.

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

 

 

Know Your Client’s Preferences

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Imagine this: you’ve worked for hours putting together the proposal that your prospective client requested and are ready to send it. You choose what you believe to be the most efficient way to communicate—you e-mail the document. You expect that your prospect is checking e-mail regularly and will be contacting you within a few hours to seal the deal.  You have a mental picture of yourself signing the contract and depositing a nice check into your account.

What you don’t know is that your prospect doesn’t check e-mail frequently.  You failed to find out what form of communication this person prefers and how he wanted to receive the document.  Sadly for you, your competitor is on the ball and knows.  By the time your e-mail proposal is opened and read, the deal is done, but not with you.

Maybe you called the prospect, who was out of the office at the time, so you left the information on voice mail and waited all day for a response.  As it turns out, he only checks voice mail once at the end of every day and returns his calls in the morning. Again, your competition knew this and sent an email instead.

We are absolutely overwhelmed with ways to transmit information. Current studies indicate that e-mail is the business communication tool of choice. However, many people still prefer the telephone, the office staple since Alexander Graham Bell first spoke to Mr. Watson from another room.  The phone is no longer permanently attached to the wall nor does it reside on a desk all day. Now that phones are mobile, people carry their phones with them. Some people even wear them like an accessory.

Phones are also “smart” now so they can do everything that you used to have a landline, a computer and a fax machine for. Their latest trick is texting. Skip email. Forget calling and just send a cryptic text message. There is an entire segment of our population that does not know any other way to communicate than to text. After all, it is so convenient. You can text anytime, anywhere to almost anybody. The business person who doesn’t text is considered to be something akin to the dinosaur.

We all have our preferred means of communication.  If you want to be successful, grow your business and develop good client relationships, find out how your clients want to communicate.  Just because you think that e-mail is the most efficient tool doesn’t mean that your clients and prospects like to sit in front of a computer all day watching messages pour in. Some may prefer to use the phone so they can discuss issues and gauge reactions – something that is hard to do with e-mail.  Others may like getting your proposal in person and would prefer a face-to-face meeting in the office or over a meal. And don’t forget that group of people who want it quick and dirty so they text all day.

Respecting your client’s preferences is not just a courtesy, it’s good business.  It’s not about you; it’s about your client. How can you tell which way your client prefers to communicate? Ask. It’s as simple as that.

If you’ve emerged from the cave and think that you are now using every means available to stay in touch with and in front of your clients and prospects, there is a next level—that of social networking. I am not going to be your expert on this topic today, but I can tell you who is. Check out my friend Jerry Gitchel’s latest blog on Make Technology Work to learn how to be a savvy social networker.

Here’s to made-to-order communication!

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

Mouth Noises Over The Phone – Choose The Smile

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You may think that while you are sitting alone talking on your phone, people can’t see what you are doing. In this mad world of multi-tasking, absolutely no one feels comfortable doing just one thing at a time. We have to be doing two or three things at once or we feel guilty. So when we are on the phone, we can’t simply focus on the caller. We need to be checking email, sending text messages, shuffling the piles of paper on our desk, eating our lunch, drinking a soda, chewing our gum and cracking our ice.

Some people even smoke while talking on the phone. They sneak outside to the safe area for a cigarette and use the time to return phone calls.You know them. You’ve heard them exhaling. And how about the yawners?

All of those sounds and distractions are obvious to the person on the other end of the line unless you managed to hit the mute key. People know when they don’t have your full attention. They know if you have muted your phone.

To me the most offensive sounds are  mouth noises over the phone.  This is no time to grab your lunch, finish off those few potato chips, chew your gum, crack your ice or slurp your coffee. Not only are you not fooling people, you are offending them with your lack of phone courtesy. Instead of turning on clients, you are turning them off.

However, of all the mouth noises over the phone, there is one that your caller would like to hear. Can you guess? It’s your smile. People on the other end of the line cannot see your smile, but they can definitely hear it. Try it. Perhaps you don’t feel like smiling. Maybe you are having a bad day. Do it anyway even if it isn’t coming from your heart. A smile, genuine or fake, changes the tone of your voice.

When you choose to make mouth noises over the phone, go with a smile. It’s good manners. It demonstrates your attention to business etiquette…and it enhances client relationships which ultimately adds to your profits.

If you want more tips on telephone courtesy, I have written an e-book Business Etiquette 101 – Telephone CourtesyClick here to learn more.

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

Teaching Manners To Children

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This past weekend I had the opportunity to attend The National Speakers Association Carolinas Chapter meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina.The chapter is comprised of wonderfully talented people from all across the Carolinas. It is about a four hour drive from my home in Savannah to Charlotte, and trip is made up of three extremely boring interstate highways. The kind that easily become parking lots if anything out of the ordinary occurs, like a speeder pulled over by a patrol car. Desperate for some entertainment many of the drivers slow down to gawk, resulting producing a traffic jam.

I endure this drive often, not simply to attend a speakers meeting where I can hone my skills and interact with other professional speakers, but numerous other times so I can visit my grandchildren who live in Charlotte. On this particular weekend it was a two for one: the chance to learn from an extremely talented storyteller and teacher named Doug Stevenson, and spend precious time with Sam (age 8) and Harry (age 6).

I am often asked if I would consider teaching manners to children. My reply is a resounding “No.” My first job was as a teacher of French at the high school level. And for a good reason. I never felt comfortable around small children but thoroughly enjoyed teenagers. That’s weird, I know. I have turned down requests for teaching manners to children, unless of course they were my own. My daughters had manners lessons on a regular basis and not necessarily upon request.

During my visit with Sam and Harry (oh, and my daughter and her husband!), I found myself  teaching  manners to children, my own grandsons  Friday night we went out to dinner, taking the boys to Red Robin, their favorite eatery and possibly the noisiest.  As we entered the restaurant, my daughter reached for the outer door. I quickly took the boys by the hand and pulled them back as they raced for the open door. Then I quietly asked if they had ever heard of “Ladies First.” They gave me a puzzled look so I explained that holding doors for ladies and allowing them to enter first is good manners. I went so far as to suggest that they should always hold the door for their mother.

Holding doors became quite a game for the weekend. Neither my daughter nor I could get anywhere near a door that wasn’t already being held by both Harry and Sam. Now that I am back home and the boys are back in their usual routine, I wonder if they remembered today to hold the day for their mother. I am thinking that maybe I do teach manners to children, and I have discovered it’s fun. Maybe I will try it on some other unsuspecting children.

Meanwhile it is back to speaking and writing about business etiquette for adults who want to add the polish that builds profits.

Here’s to teaching manners to children and holding doors for others, regardless of age or gender…

professional speaker

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.