Category Archives: Customer Service

The Business Apology

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The business apology can be worth its weight in gold when done properly. With an intentional strategy, it becomes a part of the overall customer experience and part of a plan involving customer acquisition, retention, and loyalty. It goes without saying that an apology is critical when a company has made a mistake. Just as important, it needs to be part of the customer service approach when the company has not made a mistake, but the customer believes it has. It’s incredible how many organizations don’t know how, when, or even why to apologize and fail to train their employees on the value of uttering with sincerity the words, “I’m sorry.”

There are nine simple steps to a good business apology.

  1. Say, “I’m sorry.” In spite of what your lawyer may have told you, those should be the first words out of your mouth. (Note: If the incident could result in any kind of legal action or liability then delaying long enough to seek legal advice is prudent and necessary.)
  2. Be sincere. Your body language and tone of voice need to match your words. First, people believe what they see more than what they hear. A fake apology doesn’t fool anyone.
  3. React quickly. An apology that is several days old loses its credibility and effectiveness.       A lot of damage can be done if you wait too long.
  4. Drop the excuses. Take responsibility for whatever you said or did. You weaken your apology when you start piling on excuses such as “I was having a bad day” or “I just broke up with my girlfriend.” The last sentence actually came straight out of the mouth of a server in a restaurant. The customer was not impressed.
  5. Forget the blame game. It doesn’t matter whose fault it was. It happened.
  6. Make amends. Do whatever you can to set things right. I recently sent one of my products to a customer. The item did not arrive on the day I promised, and I had an unhappy individual on my hands. I apologized and sent a replacement overnight. There was an additional cost to me, but I won over the customer who has since come back for additional products and services. The shipping company was at fault, but the customer didn’t care and it was up to me to take responsibility and correct the situation.
  7. Don’t get defensive and argumentative. Once you get your dander up, you are headed for trouble and will only make the situation worse. One of my favorite sayings is “Never argue with an idiot.  Those watching may not be able to tell the difference.”
  8. Listen without interrupting.  When customers get upset, they need to vent.   Often they require something to chew on and that may be you. Let them. You may learn something important from what they say. When you interrupt people, you are likely to miss hearing valuable information that could help you resolve the issue.
  9. Finally, don’t go overboard and over-apologize.  Say what you need to say and do what you need to do, then move on. You will only make matters worse with excessive apologies. As the saying goes, “When you find yourself in a hole, don’t keep digging.”

People can come up with any number of reasons not to apologize, but there are many more reasons for the business apology.  Number one is because it is the right thing to do. Plus, it is good customer service, which is good for business and that’s good for the bottom line.

Lydia Ramsey is a Savannah-based business etiquette expert, keynote speaker, trainer and author. Contact her at 912-604-0080 or visit her website: LydiaRamsey.com. Find out how her presentations, workshops and resources can help you and your employees add the polish that builds profits.

Mind Your Manners Especially When Complaining

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I watched in dismay as the man ahead of me in the grocery store checkout line verbally assaulted the cashier. He had remained silent while the woman at the register rang up his purchase of a single tomato, accepted his money and handed him his change along with the bagged item. Having waited for just the right moment, he lashed out at the unsuspecting employee in a voice that could be heard all over the store. His exact words were, “I want you to know why I don’t shop here. It’s because your tomatoes are the highest-priced in town. I’d rather drive farther to another store than shop here.”

The cashier’s immediate reaction was several seconds of stunned silence, giving the customer the opportunity to repeat his accusation in case she and everyone else within earshot had failed to hear him the first time. At this point I’m thinking, “Excuse me, don’t look now, but you’re here in this store and you just bought that tomato.” The cashier had evidently heard complaints like this before so, finding her voice, she launched her rebuttal in a futile effort to justify the price of the tomato.

Conventional wisdom says that the customer is always right and that the employee does not bicker with the clientele. In a perfect retail environment, managers train their employees in the art of customer service. Too bad they can’t teach their customers how to treat employees with courtesy and respect as well.

Several things seemed obvious in this situation. No one forced the man to purchase the tomato in question. There are enough grocery stores that surely he could have found one with prices more to his liking and spared the blameless cashier and others his abusive outburst.

More importantly, if he wanted to convey his message in a constructive way, the cashier was not the person to tell. The unhappy shopper should have asked to speak to a manager and shared his observation in a positive tone. Another option would have been to  put his concern in the form of a question and asked, “Could you explain why the price of your tomatoes is so high?”

The rules for customer behavior are simple:

  • Take the complaint to the appropriate employee—that is usually not the frontline person.
  • Do it privately—there is no need to involve other customers.
  • Be pleasant—a confrontational attitude only makes matters worse.
  • Even when the customer is right, he does not have the right to be abusive and unkind.

One of my favorite quotes when I am counseling groups or individuals on the art of customer service is from Mark Twain who said, “Never argue with an idiot, onlookers won’t be able to tell the difference.”

Lydia Ramsey is a Savannah-based business etiquette expert, keynote speaker, trainer and author. Contact her at 912-604-0080 or visit her website: LydiaRamsey.com to find out how her presentations and workshops can help you and your employees add the polish that builds profits.

How Much is Rudeness Costing Your Business?

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Business Etiquette - The Key to SuccessHave you ever thought about how much rudeness may be affecting your bottom line? What is the cost to your company when the people who represent you lack proper manners?

Do you know how many clients are turned off by employees who would rather carry on a conversation with each other than with the client? Can you count the number of people who hang up and call someone else because the person who answered your phone put them on hold without asking permission?

How does the client rate your professionalism when the employee who welcomes him to your office looks as if she is dressed for a day at the beach? Are your employees treating each other with courtesy and respect? Do they work as a team and help each other out or do they act like cast members on Survivor?

Try taking this quick true/false quiz to test your own business etiquette expertise. Then run it by your employees to assess their rudeness quotient.

    1. Business etiquette is based on rank and hierarchy.
    2. If the information on your business card is incorrect, draw a line through it and write the correct information on the card.
    3. Business casual means dressing down one notch from business professional.
    4. In today’s relaxed business environment, it is not necessary to ask your clients’ permission before using their first names.
    5. Callers do not mind holding for information as much as holding for a person.
    6. Handwritten notes are out of place in the business world.
    7. A man should wait for a woman to put out her hand in business before offering his.
    8. When composing an e-mail message, complete the “To” line last.
    9. Small talk around the office is a waste of time.
    10. If you receive a call on your cell phone when you are with a client, it’s fine to check to see who’s calling, but don’t answer.

Answers:

    1. In business, you defer to the senior or highest ranking person, regardless of age or gender.
    2. Handing out business cards with information that is outdated is unprofessional. Have new cards printed immediately.
    3. Business casual is not an excuse to wear your favorite old clothes to the office. It’s business. Look professional.
    4. Don’t assume you can call clients by their first name. Use titles and last names until asked to do otherwise.
    5. Clients will wait patiently while you search for information on their behalf.
    6. Handwritten notes have become as rare as the typewriter. Stand out from your competition by sending your clients handwritten notes.
    7. In business it is off-putting when a man hesitates to extend his hand to a woman.
    8. If you wait until you have carefully proofed your message before you hit “send”, you will never be embarrassed or have to apologize for your email errors.
    9. Small talk in the office is a great way to build relationships among co-workers.
    10. It is just as rude to check your phone to see who called as it is to take a call in front of a client. Turn your phone off and check your messages later.

If you had trouble with any of these questions, your employees will, too. If you want your employees to be at ease in business situations, to represent you well and help build your business, give them the information they need. If you haven’t engaged in business etiquette skills training lately, do it now. Don’t let rudeness cost you business.

No one is born with good manners. People have to be taught, and from time to time, they need to be reminded of what they already know.

Lydia Ramsey is a Savannah-based business etiquette expert, keynote speaker, trainer and author. Contact her at 912-604-0080 or visit her website: LydiaRamsey.com to find out how her presentations and workshops can help you and your employees add the polish that builds profits.

 

Telephone Etiquette is Crucial to Customer Service

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Telephone etiquette is a critical ingredient to making a positive first impression.  Make sure that you and everyone else who has access to your clients by phone know and practice professional courtesy. A training session on telephone etiquette is one way to insure consistency and professionalism.

Make no assumptions—not everyone has appropriate manners. Whoever answers your phone represents the entire organization and its philosophy about customer service.

Here are some suggestions for what your employees need to know.

Answer the phone promptly. Every call should be answered between the first and third ring. In many instances the caller hears a preliminary ring that you may not. What you think is the first ring may in fact be the second. We live in a world of instant expectations. If you don’t answer the phone immediately, people assume that you are either closed for the day, out of business or simply provide poor service. Answer the phone as soon as it rings, and grab that customer before your competition does.

Identify yourself immediately. One of the top complaints about telephone etiquette is that people fail to give their name. Whether you are placing or receiving a call, identify yourself right away. No one wants to guess who you are or be put in the awkward position of having to ask.

Be prepared with pen and paper. People are not impressed when you have to search for pencil and paper. If you aren’t prepared to take information, perhaps you aren’t prepared to do business.

Take accurate messages. Because of voice mail we don’t take messages as often as we used to, and we fail to mention this vital step in our telephone etiquette training. If you need to do so, check that you have written the information correctly. Repeat the spelling of the caller’s name. Double check the phone number as well as the wording of the message.

Transfer calls smoothly. Most of us cringe when someone says, “Let me transfer your call.” We have visions of being passed around from person to person and telling our story over and over again before finding someone who can help. If you need to transfer a call, ask the caller to hold while you confirm that you are sending the call to the right person and that that person is indeed available.

Manage the hold key with courtesy. In most telephone surveys, people rank being put on hold as their biggest frustration. Ask your callers’ permission before placing them on hold and wait to hear their reply. Answering the phone with a “hold, please” and immediately hitting the hold key will gain you nothing but an annoyed caller.

Put a smile on your face when you answer the phone. Even if you aren’t feeling cheery, your callers don’t need to know. A smile changes the entire tone of your voice and is audible over the phone. You would smile if the customer was standing in front of you—or I hope you would—so smile on the phone. Fake it if you have to, but do it.

At the end of the day, ask yourself what kind of impression you gave your callers. Was it your best and your company’s best? Did you treat every caller as valuable? If not, remind yourself that there is no such thing as an unimportant phone call and that you are the voice of the business.

Lydia Ramsey is a Savannah-based business etiquette expert, keynote speaker, trainer and author. Contact her at 912-604-0080 or visit her website: LydiaRamsey.com to find out how her presentations and workshops can help you and your employees add the polish that builds profits.

Please and Thank You – The Most Powerful Business Words

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In just about every language in the world, there are words for saying “please” and “thank you”, but there are people who seem to have forgotten them or simply dropped them from their vocabulary altogether.  In business and in personal life, using those few phrases and the body language that reinforces them, adds to your success.  Whether you are dealing with a client, a coworker, family member or friend, expressing courtesy and respect will take your farther faster than a speeding BMW.

A simple “Thank you for taking time to meet me today” when you greet your client or “Thank you for calling” when you respond to a phone call, makes that person feel valued. In today’s online environment, “please” and “thank you”, should have a place in your email and text messages as well even if, sadly, they show up as “pls” and thx.”

Practicing civility not only makes other people feel good, it can also make you feel good. It’s the power of positivity.  As a result of you using these polite words, you will drive more business your way. And you will enhance your relationships with clients and customers.

That magic word “please” –as your mother called it—needs to be a part of your everyday language.  When you ask someone to do something for you, adding “please” turns a demand into a request.  When the clerk shoves a paper in front of you and says, “Sign here”, it sounds abrupt.  When that person takes the time to add “please”, the interaction turns pleasant. A “thank-you” seals the deal.

Using the right words is critical, but if the body language and the tone of voice don’t match, it will do you no good.  When you deal with other people, take the time to look at them, make eye contact and smile.  The smile on your face will resound in your voice, and your eyes will send an important message—one that says you are focusing on the person in front of you.

Think of the times you have gone through a check-out line and the cashier has not acknowledged you with so much as a greeting, a smile or eye contact. How did that make you feel? Invisible? Unimportant? Unappreciated? If so, join the army of people who have felt the same way. Is this how you want your clients or potential clients to feel?

In the high-tech world, we need to be careful that speed and efficiency don’t replace the personal touch.  Using the right words with appropriate body language and tone of voice make all the difference in the world, especially when you assess the bottom line. Once again, adding polish builds profits.

Photo from Savanah magazine

Lydia Ramsey is a  business etiquette expert who believes it’s not about rules–it’s about relationships. She is keynote speaker, trainer and author of several books. Contact her at 912-604-0080 or visit her website: LydiaRamsey.com to find out how she can help you and your employees add the polish that builds profits.

 

Customer Service Means Taking The Heat

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Customer Service

Are you good at taking the heat when your customers lose their cool?

Have you ever noticed that no matter how hard you try to please and provide good customer service; there are people who seem determined to be difficult?  These people get downright cranky or out and out angry.  Trying to soothe an irate customer is challenging, especially when so many people feel entitled to act as rude as they possibly can.

Let me suggest a process that I learned from a fellow speaker, Judy Hoffman, the author of Keeping Cool on the Hot Seat: Dealing Effectively with the Media in Times of Crisis.  She also produced an audio program, Dealing with Angry People, where she outlines a method for “taking the heat.”  She uses the acronym “HEAT” for handling troublesome encounters and diffusing tense situations.

“H” stands for “HEAR”. That one thing we seldom do.  We don’t hear because we fail to listen. Some people are hard of hearing; others are hard of listening. We don’t pay attention to what the customer is saying because we are either too busy thinking of what we are going to say next or because we assume that we know what the problem is before hearing the person out.

Listen. Don’t interrupt.  Let the person finish the tirade before you jump in. You’ll be amazed at what you can hear when you keep your mouth shut.

E” is for “EMPATHIZE”.  The dictionary definition of “empathy” is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. Let your customers know that you understand how they feel and why. Recently I was with friends at a local restaurant. We had reservations, but the table we had requested was not available and would not be for some time. Even though we all behaved like polite adults, the hostess took the initiative to say that she wouldn’t blame us if we had gotten upset. She acknowledged that she herself would have been unhappy. Good call on her part.

A” is for “APOLOGIZE”.  Offer an apology even if the problem is not your fault. It is easier for some people to say they are sorry than it is for others.  Don’t pull a third-grader and try to blame someone else. Often all the angry person wants is to hear the words, “I’m sorry.”  Taking the high road and apologizing, even when you didn’t do it, can calm even the most irate customer.

T” is for “TAKING ACTION”.  Once you’ve heard the person out, empathized with the situation, offered an apology, let your customer know what you will do about the situation and do it.  Even if your action is to take the issue to a higher level for resolution or compensation, act without delay and let the customer know how you are handling the problem.

It is difficult, if not impossible, to remain angry or have an argument with someone who won’t fight back.  If you resist the urge to become defensive and confrontational, your unhappy customer will soon lose steam and begin to calm down.  Your cool headedness can diffuse a hot situation when you remember to “take the heat.”

How Do You React to Poor Customer Service?

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How often have you encountered a surly sales clerk or a sour server? Unfortunately, most of us find ourselves on the receiving end of poor customer service more frequently than we’d like.  Some people just seem to show up for work in a bad mood. Like your mother used to say, “They act like they got up on the wrong side of the bed.” When the cashier ignores you or the waiter doesn’t have time to be friendly, it shouldn’t be your problem, but it is.  How should you, as the customer, react when you run into this kind of behavior?  Should you respond in kind, chastise the employee, report the incident to the next level or simply go away and never come back?

Start by treating others as you would like to be treated.  That’s not such a novel idea. Everyone knows the Golden Rule, but some people seem to have forgotten it or perhaps they made a conscious decision not to play by it.  When you find yourself face-to-face with a grump, take the high road. Start by making eye contact, smiling and speaking in a pleasant manner. The grouchy person might possibly perk up and react positively to your behavior.

If your upbeat attitude does not rub off, resist the urge to counterattack.   Going straight for the throat at the first sign of trouble will only make the situation worse and cause you to look bad in the eyes of everyone else. In today’s world, people tend to take matters into their own hands. We see examples of rage and anger all too often, and they never end well.

When you encounter poor customer service or rude behavior, report it to the appropriate person and do so politely. Stay calm. Your concerns will be taken much more seriously if you are cool and collected.  If you rail at the manager, your complaint will be discounted. You will look like the problem rather than the employee.

You can choose to avoid the issue by walking out and vowing never to return. With this kind of non-reaction, you do the business a disservice. Since avoidance is the last thing any establishment wants, give the owner or manager a chance to correct the problem.  Find a manager and report the issue.  The way those in charge react to your problem will let you know if your business is appreciated.

We all want to feel valued, especially when we are parting with our hard-earned dollars.  It is never too much to expect to be treated with kindness, courtesy and respect. Those businesses and their employees who don’t make customer service a priority and the responsibility of everyone in the organization will find themselves wondering where all their customers have gone.

Photo from Savanah magazine

Lydia Ramsey is on a mission to stamp out rudeness and enhance professional conduct in the workplace. She is a Savannah-based business etiquette expert, sought-after speaker, trainer, author and newspaper columnist. Contact her at 912-604-0080 or visit her at LydiaRamsey.com to leave a comment, ask a question or learn more about her programs and products. The author of Manners That Sell – Adding the Polish That Builds Profits and Lydia Ramsey’s Little Book of Table Manners, Lydia is available to speak at your next conference or meeting.

 

 

 

Good Manners Equal Good Customer Service

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customer serviceDo you think that good manners and customer service are one and the same?  If you answered “yes”, you’re right.  Isn’t it amazing how many people don’t seem to understand that today?

Everywhere you turn, there is someone with a horror story about customer service. Any businessperson who doesn’t believe that good customer relations are the key to success will not be around long.  Treat people well, and they will continue to come back. Treat them poorly, and they will go elsewhere.

When people have a bad experience, they usually leave without saying why.  When the waiter is rude, you don’t go back to that restaurant. And you rarely tell the owner what went wrong.

However, when the name of that restaurant comes up in conversation, chances are good that you will tell other people more than they wanted to know about your unfortunate experience.  If the incident was bad enough, you won’t wait for an excuse to speak up. You’ll create one, and the people you tell will pass your story on.

Offering quality customer service is simply a matter of good manners and basic courtesy.  It means smiling at the customer and making eye contact, not just putting your hand out for the money while chatting on your cell phone with a friend.  Simply put, focus on the customer.

Hold the door for people coming into your business. Rise when someone enters your office. See that people are comfortable if they have to wait.  Offer a cup of coffee or something to read. Having Wi-Fi available is a must these days. Some doctors’ offices have even installed televisions in their exam rooms so patients can pass the time watching their favorite shows.

Listen to your customers when they have a problem and sympathize.  Take responsibility for what goes wrong if even you don’t feel it was your fault.

When people feel valued, they will come back.  If they sense that you could care less about them or their needs, they will look around until they find someone who does care. It may take a while; but when it happens, your customer is history.

It is always easier to keep current customers than to try to find new ones. Use the same customer service strategies for everyone, and you will see your business and your bottom line grow.  You can learn more about customer service in my book Manners That Sell!

customer service

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com.

The Business Apology: How to Say You’re Sorry

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ApologyToday there was an article in my local paper, the Savannah Morning News, about a new restaurant in town. While this recently opened establishment, Cotton and The Rye, is getting rave reviews for its cuisine, this article was touting their outstanding customer service. It all had to do with the art of the business apology and how the owners handled a major snafu that enraged more than a few customers.

A business apology can be worth its weight in gold and is not something that is always done properly. There is an art to the apology. When handled correctly, an apology can build customer loyalty and enhance business growth; still it’s amazing how many people don’t know how, when, or even why to apologize.

Let me suggest nine steps to a good business apology.

  1. Say, “I’m sorry.” In spite of what your lawyer may have told you, those should be the first words out of your mouth.
  2. Be sincere. Your body language and tone of voice need to match your words.  People believe what they see more than what they hear. Look and sound as if you truly are sorry. And by the way, feel it.
  3. React quickly. An apology that is several days old loses its credibility and effectiveness.
  4. Drop the excuses. Take responsibility for whatever you said or did. You weaken your apology when you start piling on excuses such as “I was having a bad day” or “I just broke up with my girlfriend.” The last sentence actually came straight out of the mouth of a server in a restaurant.
  5. Forget the blame game. It does not matter whose fault it was. It happened.
  6. Make amends. Do whatever you can do set things right. I recently sent one of my products to a customer. The item did not arrive on the day I promised, and I had an unhappy individual on my hands. To set things right, I said  I was sorry and would send a replacement overnight. There was a significant cost to me, but I won over a customer who has since come back to me for additional products or services.
  7. Don’t get defensive. Once you get your dander up, you are headed for trouble and will only make the situation worse. One of my favorite sayings is “Never argue with an idiot. Those watching may not be able to tell the difference.”
  8. Listen without interrupting. When customers get upset, they need to vent.  Often they require something to chew on and that may be you. Let them. You may learn something important from what they say.
  9. Finally, don’t go overboard and over-apologize. Make your first apology your last. Say what you need to say and do what you need to do to make things right, then move on. You will only make things  worse by excessively apologizing. As the saying goes, “When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.”

People can come up with any number of reasons not to apologize, but there are just as many for saying “I’m sorry.” Number one on that list is because it is the right thing to do. Not only that, it is good customer service which is good for business and business growth.

Photo from Savannah magazine

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com

Customer Service Training Pays Off

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Business Etiquette - The Key to SuccessHow many times have you been the victim of poor customer service? At one time or another, we’ve all been on the receiving end of bad manners. Perhaps when you walked into a store,  the salespeople were more interested in finding out what each other had done the night before rather than helping you. Maybe you made a phone call to request service and were greeted with the smack, smack, smack of chewing gum. Could be you asked a question about how to use a new product only to see boredom and disdain cloud the eyes of the support person just before he lapsed into condescending language with you.

I’ve heard (and passed along) horror stories like these—and much worse. There was the clerk chatting away on her cell phone, never bothering to ask if I needed help, and the receptionist who didn’t look up from her magazine until I had reached her desk and stood there for some time.

Usually we leave these businesses with distaste and disappointment, our money still tucked in our wallets. The next time we need a similar service or product,  we go elsewhere. We’re not likely to return to the place where we were treated rudely and where customer service is not a priority.

In my business etiquette presentations, I ask for a show of hands from those people who will go out of their way and pay more money for the same product or service because they prefer being treated with kindness and respect. Just about every hand goes up and heads nod.

It is common knowledge that all things being equal, we tend to do business with people we know, like and trust. And when all things are not equal, we still tend to do business with people we know, like and trust.

Good manners and customer service are one and the same.

Any business that doesn’t understand that customer relations have everything to do with success will not be around long. If we treat people well, they will become loyal customers. If we treat them poorly, they will leave. Worse, they’ll tell all their friends about their poor customer service experience.

There’s one basic rule to teach every employee at your company whether you own a Fortune 500 or a mom and pop store on the corner. It’s the Golden Rule. Treat your customers and clients the way that you want to be treated. Better yet adopt the Platinum Rule and treat your customers the way they want to be treated.

When people enter your business, greet them immediately. Smile and make eye contact.

Hold the door open when you see them coming. Rise when someone enters your office.

Call people by name. Wow!

Don’t keep people waiting. When they must wait, tell them how long it will be and make them comfortable by offering a cup of coffee or a glass of water and something to read.

Listen attentively when your customers have problems and offer to help.

Take responsibility when things go wrong even if it wasn’t your fault. The most irate customer can be calmed by this selfless act in a world so accustomed to the lively game of blame.

It really isn’t complicated. If we treat clients and customers with courtesy, we send a message that we value them. When people feel valued, they come back. But if they sense you couldn’t care less about them or their needs, they will look around until they find someone who does care. It may take awhile, but when it happens, your customer is history.

An investment in customer service training is one of the best investments you will ever make in your business.

If I can help, let me know.

Photo from Savannah magazine

Photo from Savannah magazine

Hire Lydia to work with your staff to improve customer service and employee relations through the use of those priceless and often over-looked soft skills called manners. Lydia is the “unstuffy” business etiquette expert who helps individuals and organizations add the polish that builds profits. We’re talking about your bottom line here.

Since 1996, countless people have benefited from her wisdom through keynotes, seminars and conference breakout sessions.  Her Southern charm and sense of humor have made her a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Based in Savannah, Georgia, Lydia is available for national, regional and local speaking and training engagements. She has suitcase; will travel.

Contact her via email at lydia@lydiaramsey.com or call 912-604-0080. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter and visit her website, lydiaramsey.com